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psalm 137 commentary

6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy. And perhaps it is with reference to this that the man of sin, the head of the New-Testament Babylon, is called a son of perdition, 2 Thessalonians 2:3. Christ prophesied that the same atrocities would be executed upon Israel herself in the destruction of Jerusalem (Luke 19:44). 3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion. Psalms 137:2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. Far be it from us to avenge ourselves, if ever it should be in our power, but we will leave it to him who has said, Vengeance is mine. 137. Their cherished city was gone. 1706. (2.) It is an exclamation of their extreme displeasure in being compelled to do so. Let not those expect to find mercy who, when they had power, did not show mercy. The psalm is ascribed to David, but it is also designated for the … Continue reading "Commentary on Psalm 30" For what has that Babylon done to us? They did not hide their harps in the bushes, or the hollows of the rocks but hung them up in view, that the sight of them might affect them with this deplorable change. Chapter 137. NASB E-Prime R.S.V. They cannot forget Jerusalem, Psalm 137:5,6. Psalms 137 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, filling six volumes, provides an exhaustive look at every verse in the Bible. The fall of the New-Testament Babylon will be the triumph of all the saints, Revelation 19:1. How these pious captives stood affected to Jerusalem. Herewith the Psalm closes, Happy, that takes and dashes your little ones against the rock Psalm 136:9. This is the same as before, to forget, repeated for the confirmation of it. The New Century Bible Commentary: Psalms 73-150 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1972) Broyles, Craig C., New International Biblical Commentary: Psalms (Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers, 1999. Their hearts were full of it. 9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. Our tormentors insisted on a joyful hymn: “Sing us one of those songs of Jerusalem!” But how can we sing the songs of the LORD while in a pagan land? Psalm 137. In these psalms, the author (usually David, although not in Ps. 1. These short commentaries are based on Level A EasyEnglish (about 1200 word vocabulary) by Gordon Churchyard. "Complete Commentary on Psalms 137:4". Throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, the phrase has somewhat of a liturgical sense to it, as if the assembled people of Israel said or sung this in response to the direction of the Levites leading singing and worship. Go to, To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, "They that led us captive required of us songs. 2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. Book 1 (Psalms 1 - 41) » Psalms 1-41 in one file [or download in RTF format] ... Psalm 137: By The Rivers In Babylon [or download in R TF format] Psalm 138: Thanks! Josephus gave the total number of the returnees as, "Forty-two thousand four hundred and sixty two; yet did many of them stay at Babylon, as not willing to leave their possessions."[3]. They stedfastly resolved to keep up this affection. 2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. The reason they gave is very mild and pious: How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land? 137. It is a clear and judicious explanation of the text, and cannot be dispensed with. 137:0 This is Psalm 137 in the whole book, the 37 th of the third fifty. 8 O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us. "Remember, O Jehovah, against the children of Edom. 7 Remember, O LORD, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof. Thus they put shame upon Israel, who would be looked upon as a people worthy to be cut off when their next neighbours had such an ill-will to them. required of us songs, and our tormentors, mirth, saying, Observe. The psalmist penned this poem while … "In the day that thou stoodest on the other side, in the day that strangers carried away his substance, and foreigners entered into his gates, and cast lots upon Jerusalem, even thou wast as one of them" (Obadiah 1:1:11). In 586 B.C., the soldiers from Babylon destroyed the capital city of Judah, Jerusalem. "Babylon ... thou art to be destroyed" (Psalms 137:8). PSALM 137 Ps 137:1-9. The bitterness of Israel against their enemies who had vented their sadistic cruelties upon them is understandable enough, however foreign to the spirit of Christianity they must appear to us who follow Christ. Do we ask, what reward? Next » Chapter 138. Scripture: Matthew 21:1-11, Psalms 137:1-4, John 12:9-19, Luke 19:28-44, Mark 11:1-11, Psalms 118:25, Genesis 1, Acts 16:25 (view more) (view less) Denomination: Anglican. (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students: Commenting and Commentaries)Rosscup adds: This is one of the more thorough older exegetical … In singing this psalm we must be much affected with the concernments of the church, especially that part of it that is in affliction, laying the sorrows of God's people near our hearts, comforting ourselves in the prospect of the deliverance of the church and the ruin of its enemies, in due time, but carefully avoiding all personal animosities, and not mixing the leaven of malice with our sacrifices. She shall be paid in her own coin: "Thou shalt be served as thou hast served us, as barbarously used by the destroyers as we have been by thee," See Revelation 18:6. They laid by their instruments of music (Psalm 137:2): We hung our harps upon the willows. Could it? O daughter of Babylon — By which he understands the city and empire of Babylon, and the people thereof, who art to be destroyed — Who by God’s righteous and irrevocable sentence, art devoted to certain destruction, and whose destruction is particularly and circumstantially foretold by God’s holy prophets. The harps they used for their own diversion and entertainment. Happy shall those be that do it for they are fulfilling God's counsels and therefore he calls Cyrus, who did it, his servant, his shepherd, his anointed (Isaiah 44:28,45:1), and the soldiers that were employed in it his sanctified ones, Isaiah 13:3. The Babylonian slave masters were a cruel, sadistic company of evil men who made sport of the helpless captives, forcing them into actions that appeared mirthful to the captors. We put away our harps, hanging them on the branches of poplar trees. "By the rivers of Babylon, There we sat down, yea, we wept. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-137.html. A psalm of David, for Jeremias. Maré : Psalm 137 OTE 23/1 (2010), 116-128 119 The psalm not only relates the story of a specific period in Israel’s history, but it was probably utilised in the cult as an observance of lament by the exiles. Every thing is beautiful in its season. Show content in: English Both Hebrew. 139. They do not say, "How shall we sing when we are so much in sorrow?" Issuu company … 525-550.). Psalm 137 A sad song. Their extremely distasteful assignment of entertaining their captors and amusing them precipitated the bitter thoughts of the next three verses. Browse Sermons on Psalm 137:1-4. Rashi 's Commentary: Show Hide. Profane scoffers are not to be humoured, nor pearls cast before swine. And they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying. Psalm 118 repeated that affirmation five times. Do we ask, what reward? Psalms 137:5. "They that led us captive required of us songs." And all this was a fruit of the old enmity of Esau against Jacob, because he got the birthright and the blessing, and a branch of that more ancient enmity between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent: Lord, remember them, says the psalmist, which is an appeal to his justice against them. The verse, אִם אֶשְׁכָּחֵךְ יְרוּשָׁלָ‍ִם תִּשְׁכַּח יְמִינִי , “If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand wither,” is sung at traditional Jewish weddings. Their terminal representatives are featured in the New Testament in the evil dynasty of the Herods. Tehillim - Psalms - Chapter 137 « Previous Chapter 136. PSALM 137 OVERVIEW. The following lines became their muttered pledges to themselves, perhaps out of the hearing of their tormentors. The chosen people are suffering the captivity in Babylon, enduring the sporting taunts of their enemies, and weeping over their sorrows as they contrasted their status with what it once was in their beloved Jerusalem. How shall we sing the Lord’s song — Those sacred songs which are appropriated to the worship of the true God in his temple, and are appointed by him to be sung only to his honour and in his service; in a strange land — When we are banished from our own temple and country, and among those who are strangers and enemies to our God and his worship? Recommended Resource: Psalms 76-150, Holman Old Testament Commentary by Steven Lawson More insights from your Bible study - Get Started with Logos Bible Software for Free! The Jews in exile were then told to “sing us one of the songs of Zion!” (Psalm 137:1), adding further humiliation and frustration to a defeated people. Next » Chapter 138. Now, 1. "There we sat down, yea, we wept." PSALM 137 word first as mirth and then as joy. In its whole form of nine verses, the psalm reflects the yearning for Jerusalem as well as hatred for the Holy City's enemies with sometimes violent imagery. Psalms 137 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary, filling six volumes, provides an exhaustive look at every verse in the Bible. Matthew Henry :: Commentary on Psalms 137 ← Back to Matthew Henry's Bio & Resources . (1-4) Their affection for Jerusalem. If they must build houses there (Jeremiah 29:5), it shall not be in the cities, the places of concourse, but by the rivers, the places of solitude, where they might mingle their tears with the streams. The songs of the captives would have been considered as sport or entertainment by their masters; and the very fact of their hanging their harps on the willows indicates that they unwillingly complied with such demands, muttering to themselves, perhaps, the curses upon themselves and their terrible imprecations upon the enemy. (2.) Thy word is very pure; therefore thy servant loveth it. Psalm 137 is not a selfish prayer for personal revenge. We have here the daughter of Zion covered with a cloud, and dwelling with the daughter of Babylon the people of God in tears, but sowing in tears. Bible Commentary Early Church Fathers Medieval Patristic. This was very barbarous; also profane, for no songs would serve but the songs of Zion. It was very profane and impious. It is a plea for God to intervene in the affairs of men to keep His covenant and right all wrongs. Book of Tehillim (Psalms): Psalms: Table of Contents. If this situation was common when this song was written, it would explain this line. The constant affection they retained for Jerusalem, the city of their solemnities, even now that they were in Babylon. The first is, an heavy complaint of the church, unto Psa 137:1-6. In that sense, it is reminiscent of the opening of the songs of ascents in Psalm 120, where the desire is to be delivered from a hostile foreign environment to travel to Jerusalem, as expressed in other songs of ascents, to be in fellowship with God. The Edomites seem to have been almost totally a wicked people. (Psalms 137:4). In English it is generally known as "By the rivers of Babylon", which is how its first words are translated in the King James Version.It is Psalm 136 in the slightly different numbering system of the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate versions of the Bible. 1. rivers of Babylon—the name of the city used for the whole country. Psalm 137 is one of several psalms called imprecatory psalms. ", "Let my right hand forget her skill ... my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth", "Remember ... against the children of Edom", "Happy shall he be that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us", "Happy shall he be that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the rock", Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. The gardens and industries thus watered were in all likelihood the areas where the Hebrew slaves would have been employed. Yet perhaps they were faulty in doing this for praising God is never out of season it is his will that we should in every thing give thanks, Isaiah 24:15,16. The Jews bewail their captivity. 140. In prayer, in discourse, in conversation. The psalmist penned this poem while … Psalms 137, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary is a one-volume commentary prepared by Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset and David Brown 2 of my commentaries on the minor prophets, pp. Psalms 137:7. They were the ones who clung tenaciously to the blessed memories of Jerusalem and the glory of Israel's past history. Those that are confederate with the persecutors of good people, and stir them up, and set them on, and are pleased with what they do, shall certainly be called to an account for it against another day, and God will remember it against them. Tehillim - Psalms - Chapter 137 « Previous Chapter 136. It reflects the sorrows and thoughts of one of the captives, either during the captivity itself, or shortly afterward when the memories of … A godly man will prefer a public good before any private satisfaction or gratification whatsoever. 2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. 1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. Audio Commentary: Psalm 137 Psalm 137 1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. Rashi 's Commentary: Show Hide. Psalm 137. No songs would serve them but the songs of Zion, with which God had been honoured so that in this demand they reflected upon God himself as Belshazzar, when he drank wine in temple-bowls. For our captors demanded a song from us. "Them that wasted us, or `tormentors'" (Psalms 137:3b). Enduring Word Bible Commentary Psalm 137 Psalm 137 – The Mournful Song of the Exiles Because this psalm is a remembrance of Babylon, many commentators believe it was written after the return from exile. How stedfastly they resolved to keep up this affection, which they express by a solemn imprecation of mischief to themselves if they should let it fall: "Let me be for ever disabled either to sing or play on the harp if I so far forget the religion of my country as to make use of my songs and harps for the pleasing of Babylon's sons or the praising of Babylon's gods. (See Vol. The land of Babylon was now a house of bondage to that people, as Egypt had been in their beginning. Psalm 137:9 shocks: “Blessed shall he be who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!”. 2. Browse Sermons on Psalm 137:1-4. Psalm 137 Series Contributed by Sam Mccormick on Mar 11, 2020 | 2,390 views. Commentary for Psalms 137 . Psalm 137 is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people during their Babylonian exile. 3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required […] Righteous art thou, O LORD and upright are thy judgments. Jeremiah had taught them under this yoke to sit alone, and keep silence, and put their mouths in the dust, Lamentations 3:28,29. They took the people who lived there to Babylon as prisoners. Psalm 137:1 The Jews just bawled their eyes out. Our Price: $13.99 Save: $26.00 (65%) Buy Now. For there they that led us captive required of us songs. There was not even a hope of going back to what they remembered. “The hymnic nature of the first eighteen verses seems to support the claims of Hermann Gunkel and Claus Westermann” (915). For once, there is no need for guessing about the occasion of this Psalm. Commentary on Psalm 137:5-9 (Read Psalm 137:5-9) What we love, we love to think of. Matthew Henry :: Commentary on Psalms 137 ← Back to Matthew Henry's Bio & Resources. David prudently kept silence even from good when the wicked were before him, who, he knew, would ridicule what he said and make a jest of it, Psalm 39:1,2. Bibliography InformationCoffman, James Burton. The Edomites will certainly be reckoned with, and all others that were accessaries to the destruction of Jerusalem, that were aiding and abetting, that helped forward the affliction (Zechariah 1:15) and triumphed in it, that said, in the day of Jerusalem, the day of her judgment, "Rase it, rase it to the foundations down with it, down with it do not leave one stone upon another." The other is an heavy imprecation and a prophetical denunciation against the enemies of the church, unto the end of the psalm (Psa 137:7-9). Since there are a number of imprecatory psalms, and since these passages have caused many doubts and questions in the hearts of sincere believers, I thought that we should grapple with the … Psalm 137 is one of several psalms called imprecatory psalms. This is the repayment. Psalm 137 is a song of Zion expressing desire for God’s holy city while in exile in the land of Babylon. 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